"Some people make us feel more human and some people make us feel less human and that is a fact as much as gravity is a fact and maybe there are ways to prove it, but the proof of it matters less that the existence of it—how a stranger can show up and look at you and make you make more sense to yourself and the world, even if that sense is extremely fragile and only comes around occasionally and is prone to wander or fade—what matters is that sometimes sense is made between two people and I don’t know if it’s random or there is any kind of order to it, what combinations of people work the best and why and how do we find these people and how do we keep these people around, and I don’t know if it’s chaos or not chaos but it feels like chaos to me so I suppose it is."

Catherine Lacey’s Nobody Is Ever Missing is filled with sentences as beautiful as this one. Typing it out was exhausting but also wonderful because I got to revisit it. (via bobbyfinger)

(via nogreatillusion)

"I’d just say to aspiring journalists or writers—who I meet a lot of—do it now. Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough."

I’m Ira Glass, Host of This American Life, and This Is How I Work

It’s been kind of a long week (yes, on Wednesday). I read this on the elevator leaving work today, and I had to wait a second before I could get out clear-eyed and feeling more determined than I have in awhile. So…thanks, Ira? 

teamrocketing:

i hate it when i see someone i vaguely know in public. do i say hi?? do i act like i don’t see them and hope for the best?? 

This is a real issue in my life.

(via funkyfine)

"I couldn’t stop the voice in my head that asked me to examine every little moment of joy. And not just my joy, but other people’s too. I saw how certain girls in my school would gush and gush when they were dating someone, proudly declaring that they had already picked out a wedding dress, because “I seriously think I’ve found my soulmate,” only to trash the dudes mercilessly once they broke up: “He had a small penis anyway, and I feel sorry for whatever poor sap gets him next.” The extremes made my head spin. It seemed like, to most people, others were either angels or they were hellish monsters. Where were the in-between stages? What about honestly expressing your fears and your ambivalence and your uncertainty? Embracing darkness was a way to allow for nuance and contradictions and all the other messy stuff that has always made it hard for me to write someone off completely or fully idolize anyone. My darkness helped me see things—and people—on a spectrum."

Rookie » Hello, Darkness

Several years ago, photographer Gregg Segal started a series that juxtaposes “an idealized Civil War embodied by period re-enactors” with “the commercialism of contemporary life.” He staged shoots on the sites of battlefields long built over with highways, housing developments, and shopping malls. He originally shot in Tennessee, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. We commissioned Segal to add to his series with photographs at sites from the Atlanta Campaign.
(via Atlanta Magazine)

Several years ago, photographer Gregg Segal started a series that juxtaposes “an idealized Civil War embodied by period re-enactors” with “the commercialism of contemporary life.” He staged shoots on the sites of battlefields long built over with highways, housing developments, and shopping malls. He originally shot in Tennessee, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. We commissioned Segal to add to his series with photographs at sites from the Atlanta Campaign.

(via Atlanta Magazine)

millionsmillions:

The big second-half 2014 preview is here at last, and it’s a doozy — with books by Haruki Murakami, David Mitchell, Ian McEwan, Marilynn Robinson, Denis Johnson, Hilary Mantel, Margaret Atwood, and 77 more.

millionsmillions:

The big second-half 2014 preview is here at last, and it’s a doozy — with books by Haruki Murakami, David Mitchell, Ian McEwan, Marilynn Robinson, Denis Johnson, Hilary Mantel, Margaret Atwood, and 77 more.

(via nogreatillusion)

Tags: gimme

moosekleenex:

Maxi dresses.

moosekleenex:

Maxi dresses.

(via tastefullyoffensive)

Tags: gpoy

the-streetstyle:

Dressing it down.via sidewalkready

I kind of miss fall?It’s July.

the-streetstyle:

Dressing it down.
via sidewalkready

I kind of miss fall?

It’s July.

(via funkyfine)